one to one logo

social facebook box blue 32social twitter box blue 32social rss box orange 32social google box 32

Featured On K 12 Bluprint badge
header picture 1
Up

Research Library

Education technology—“Edtech”—has become an area of intense innovation and debate—with topics like Massive Open Online Courses, coding for kids, and tablets constantly attracting attention and sparking debate every day.

But how are teachers and students responding to the constant influx of new digital tools?

The latest Pew Research Center Internet and American Life survey of 2,500 Advanced Placement (AP) and National Writing Project (NWP) teachers from 6th to 12th grade suggests that while edtech is infiltrating classrooms, key disparities are affecting how teachers teach and how their students learn.

BYOD is a reasonable choice for districts with the following conditions: cost is a critical factor, wide bandwidth is available, and there is a large student population with limited income to purchase separate devices for school and home. Additionally, the IT staff is well organized, capable, and experienced. BYOD is not appropriate for all districts but it is a compelling choice for the many districts that have this combination of factors.

One to one initiatives are developing at a rapid rate within education across the globe as governments and schools realise the potential for technology in developing 21st century teaching styles. The education sector clearly provides a vast target market for vendors and component suppliers alike, with over 1.45 billion enrolled students and teachers across the world. Declining prices, increased product customisation, digitisation of education content and a growing trend toward government investment in ICT in education are all combining to develop significant market demand. This report covers:

•Market Sizing – To quantify and track quarterly, global sales volumes and installed base of notebooks, netbooks and tablets in K12 education
•Market Forecasting – To develop five year sales forecasts, reviewing key feature set developments.
•Investment Status – To identify shifts in education spending and government plans
•Product, Technology, & Competitive Review – To identify and interpret key market developments and trends.

For further details, or if you have any questions, please email Phillip.Maddocks@futuresource-hq.com or
Kate.Russell@futuresource-hq.com

A resource for education leaders interested in implementing anytime, anywhere, anyway technology-supported learning in K-12 education.

No two students are alike. Each and every child deserves learning opportunities tailored for his or her unique needs, abilities, and interests. Impossible? Not with smart, adaptable curriculum powered by today’s educational technology.

Technology has a crucial role to play in preparing young people for success in the 21st century. But this success requires more than simply placing the right tools in students’ hands. To help promote success, Intel provides this comprehensive blueprint for building ambitious and effective technology initiatives, based on real-world
successes, that takes into account the complex array of variables that impact schools today.

As technologies and broadband become more widely available and as the focus on integrating technology into learning increases, interest in Flipped Learning will likely continue to grow. In recognition of this interest, the Flipped Learning Network, with the support of Pearson Education and researchers at George Mason University, undertook a comprehensive review of relevant research.

In this review, we define and describe the Flipped Learning model, briefly note its historical foundations and address common misconceptions. We discuss learning theories that underlie the model and describe current, although limited empirical research findings. We also describe concerns that have been raised.

This report is a synthesis of ongoing research, design, and implementation of an approach to education called “connected learning.” It advocates for broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement. This model is based on evidence that the most resilient,
adaptive, and effective learning involves individual interest as well as social support to overcome adversity and provide recognition.

Blended learning that combines digital instruction with live, accountable teachers holds unique promise to improve student outcomes dramatically. Schools will not realize this promise at large scale with technology improvements alone, though, or with technology and today’s typical teaching roles. In this brief, we explain how schools can use blended learning to encourage improvements in digital instruction, transform teaching into a highly paid, opportunity-rich career that extends the reach of excellent teachers to all students and teaching peers, and improve student learning at large scale. We call this a “better blend”: combining high-quality digital learning and excellent teaching. Schools can immediately pursue a better blend at small scale. To achieve excellent learning at scale, state policymakers must change state policy to enable and incentivize a better blend in large numbers of schools. These policies must address five categories: funding, people, accountability for learning, technology and student data, and timing and scalability.

The internationally recognized NMC Horizon Report series and regional NMC Technology Outlooks are part of the NMC Horizon Project, a comprehensive research venture established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact over the coming five years in education around the globe.

The first question for curriculum writers is not: “What will we teach and when should we teach it?” Rather the initial question for curriculum development must be goal focused: “Having learned key content, what will students be able to do with it?”

This second investigation of teachers and students at the Eastern Townships School Board had eight research objectives. It aimed to determine, according to the perceptions of the teachers and students, the impacts of information and communication technologies (ICT) on students’: (1) writing skills, (2) creativity, (3) communication and cooperation, (4) effective work methods, and (5) capacity to exercise critical judgment. Another aim was to identify the main (6) benefits and (7) challenges of regular use of technologies in the classroom, as well as (8) the equipment and access available to teachers and students at the school board. In all, 2,712 students (from grades 3 to 11) and 389 teachers participated in this questionnaire survey.

Decision making surrounding technology for the K-12 classroom has become a topic of great debate.  It was only a short time ago that colleges and universities faced the question of whether or not it was appropriate to allow students to bring their own computers and phones into the classroom.  Concerns about distractions and cheating initially limited their use, but quickly those concerns faded, leading to higher education classrooms today that are filled with multiple devices for each student.  K-12 schools now face a similar dilemma.  The percentage of children that have a mobile device is rapidly increasing. New educational curriculum is exploding into the market.  Textbooks are being transitioned to digital formats, including tools to annotate, collaborate and share information.  With the advent of these new and abundant sources of learning material, school leaders are faced with deciding how best to make the transition to a digital learning environment.  Will they provide devices to students to initiate a one-to-one environment, allow students to bring their own device (BYOD) or enact some blended approach?

A recent set of case studies from FSG concluded, “Blended learning has arrived in K-12 education. Over the past few years, technology has grown to influence nearly every aspect of the U.S. education system,” By the end of the decade, most U.S. schools will fully incorporate instructional technology into their structures and schedules. They will use predominantly digital instructional materials. The learning day and year will be extended. Learning will be more personalized, and the reach of effective teachers will be expanded.

Television was once the newest technology in our homes, and then came videos and computers.  Today’s children are growing up in a rapidly changing digital age that is far different from that of their parents and grandparents.  A variety of technologies are all around us in our homes, offices, and schools.  When used wisely, technology and media can support learning and relationships.  Enjoyable and engaging shared experiences that optimize the potential for children’s learning and development can support children’s relationships both with adults and their peers.

This paper is the answer to a question: What would the education policies and practices of the United States be if they were based on the policies and practices of the countries that now lead the world in student performance? It is adapted from the last two chapters of a book to be published in September 2011 by Harvard Education Press. Other chapters in that book describe the specific strategies pursued by Canada (focusing on Ontario), China (focusing on Shanghai), Finland, Japan and Singapore, all of which are far ahead of the United States. The research on these countries was performed by a team assembled by the National Center on Education and the Economy, at the request of the OECD.

One-to-one laptop programs are becoming more prevalent across the world in K-12 institutions. School districts are searching for more engaging tools that seek to have impact on school success, such as grade achievement, college/career preparation, and/or 21st-century skill preparation and attainment. Additionally, boards of education continuously want some positive indication of the return on their substantial financial investment.

The Project RED research team, which has strong ties to the One-to-One institute, recently released a report that identifies best practices for implementing technology in schools to see improvement in student achievement and cost savings.

Online learning offers a break from the factory model and a path to personalization for students and for teachers. As online learning opportunities grow, so too does the body of evidence that replaces outdated myths with a more realistic picture of student and teacher experiences with online learning.

Teachers Increasingly Rely on Media & Technology.  The eighth annual PBS teacher survey on media and technology use reflects a deepening commitment to media and digital technology that connect teachers and their students to educational resources

 
 

One-to-One Institute is an international non-profit committed to igniting
21st century education through the implementation of one-to-one technology
in K-12 education environments.

Copyright © 2020 The One-to-One Institute. All Rights Reserved.
site development and hosting by interGen web solutions