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Research Library

This review was designed to further our understanding of the link between teachers’ pedagogical beliefs and their educational uses of technology. The synthesis of qualitative findings integrates the available evidence about this relationship with the ultimate goal being to facilitate the integration of technology in education.

This study enhances the value of ubiquitous technology in a systemic transformation of teaching and learning.

A study of the 1:1 laptop program at Denver School of Science and Technology

Henrico County Public Schools Final Report.  Insights from a Pioneering Leader of One-to-One Mobile Computing

Amanda Lenhart presented nine major themes from the Project’s five-report series on Teens and Online Privacy. In a talk delivered to the Family Online Safety Institute’s annual conference on November 7th, Amanda examined youth’s social media diversification and sharing practices, privacy choices, and the ways that youth concepts of privacy differ from adults.

Blended learning that combines digital instruction with live, accountable teachers holds unique promise to improve student outcomes dramatically. Schools will not realize this promise at large scale with technology improvements alone, though, or with technology and today’s typical teaching roles. In this brief, we explain how schools can use blended learning to encourage improvements in digital instruction, transform teaching into a highly paid, opportunity-rich career that extends the reach of excellent teachers to all students and teaching peers, and improve student learning at large scale. We call this a “better blend”: combining high-quality digital learning and excellent teaching. Schools can immediately pursue a better blend at small scale. To achieve excellent learning at scale, state policymakers must change state policy to enable and incentivize a better blend in large numbers of schools. These policies must address five categories: funding, people, accountability for learning, technology and student data, and timing and scalability.

Since the first implementation in 1989, one-to-one computing programs have dramatically grown and, today, the need for personal, portable technology in the classroom is more relevant than ever. However, in order to effectively implement such programs in their own classrooms, educators need guidance and best practices. In collaboration with Intel Corporation, the One-to-One Institute developed the first National One-to-One Computing Program Database.

This report is a synthesis of ongoing research, design, and implementation of an approach to education called “connected learning.” It advocates for broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement. This model is based on evidence that the most resilient,
adaptive, and effective learning involves individual interest as well as social support to overcome adversity and provide recognition.

The digital revolution is transforming our work, our organisations and our daily lives. This revolution is already in homes across the developed world and increasingly in the developing world too. And there, it is transforming the way children and young people play, access information, communicate with each other and learn. But, so far, this revolution has not
transformed most schools or most teaching and learning in classrooms.

Where technology is used, research findings on its impact on learner outcomes are disappointing. The technological revolution however, does not allow us to abandon our ambition to use technology in classrooms. Nor can we go back to teaching the way we have been so far: the teacher at the front transmitting knowledge and the children listening quietly. The research on brain activity by Rosalind Picard and her colleagues at MIT’s Media Lab suggests that students’ brain activity is nearly non-existent during lectures - even lower than when they are asleep. Lectures equal brain “flatlining” and, as Professor Eric Mazur of Harvard University’s Physics Department puts it, students “are more asleep during lectures than when they are in bed!”

This report describes the findings of the evaluation of HCPS’s Teaching and Learning Initiative, conducted by SRI International (SRI) and Education Development Center (EDC) and based on data collected through the end of the 2003-2004 school year.

Research Report: The Wireless Writing Program 2004-2005 Prepared for: Peach River North (SD 60), Fort St. John, British Columbia, Canada

An effective secondary school design incorporates 10 integrated principles to meet the demands of the Common Core.

These were developed through a scan of design principles used by New York City Department of Education, New Visions for Public Schools, and other high-performing school networks, and refined with the feedback and contributions of experienced educators.

This second investigation of teachers and students at the Eastern Townships School Board had eight research objectives. It aimed to determine, according to the perceptions of the teachers and students, the impacts of information and communication technologies (ICT) on students’: (1) writing skills, (2) creativity, (3) communication and cooperation, (4) effective work methods, and (5) capacity to exercise critical judgment. Another aim was to identify the main (6) benefits and (7) challenges of regular use of technologies in the classroom, as well as (8) the equipment and access available to teachers and students at the school board. In all, 2,712 students (from grades 3 to 11) and 389 teachers participated in this questionnaire survey.

The Critical Skills model of instruction builds powerful lessons in classrooms ranging from pre-K to post-graduate. The model combines experiential learning, problem based learning, and rigorous high standards within an intentionally created collaborative learning community, creating the classrooms that many educators imagine, but can’t quite put together. It is the “how” in answer to the “what” of powerful classroom practice. And it was created, continues to be created, by practicing classroom teachers.

 
 

One-to-One Institute is an international non-profit committed to igniting
21st century education through the implementation of one-to-one technology
in K-12 education environments.

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